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Service>NetworkSecurity>NetSecureRansomware

Don't Become the Next Victim of Ransomware

Ransomware is a moneymaker, so it's here to stay. This is the malware that encrypts your data and then holds it for ransom, offering to sell you the decryption key. It's been very effective, costing businesses, governments and home owners an estimated $1 billion in 2016.

While security teams across the world look for ways to neutralize it, you need to do what you can not to get caught in the next attack.

  • This cannot be said often enough. BACK UP YOUR DATA. In fact, we'll go further. Make sure you have complete system backups as well, so that your programs can be reinstalled and your data reloaded as quickly as possible. This way, if you do get hit, you'll pay only in the time it takes to restore, and you'll have the grim satisfaction of knowing that the thieves didn't get one dime from you.
  • Educate your users. Before ransomware can strike, someone has to let it in the door. It usually comes through email, a phishing attack that invites the unwary user to click on the link that will download the ransomware. Train your users how to recognize phishing scams. (You can start by reading our web page on the subject.)
  • Keep your software up to date, especially your browser. Install all patches if this is not done automatically, and pay the pittance for an upgrade when it comes out. Ransomware often takes advantage of vulnerabilities that have been fixed in the latest version.

If you need advice or assistance, contact MicroComputer Resources. We are here to help.

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